10 Ways to Keep Deer Away From Hostas

Deer are a common problem for hosta lovers. One day your garden will be nice and lush, and the next morning you will be left with a bunch of chewed-off stems. This can be very frustrating, so we’ve decided to put together a blog post on ways to keep deer away from hostas to prevent this from happening to you.

keep deer away from hostas

There really is no surefire way to keep deer away from hostas. There are, however, a number of options you can use to help stop them. Several options are listed below.

Tips to Keep Deer Away From Hostas:

  1. Wireless Deer Fence – a sweet smelling deer training device that will train the deer through negative reinforcement. Effective method proven to keep deer away from hostas.
  2. Deer Scram – all natural granular repellent to keep deer away from hostas and other plants including shrubs and trees.
  3. Liquid Fence – a liquid repellent that you spray directly on your plants (be careful not to apply in direct sunlight as this could burn the plant). The scent of the spray will deter deer and other garden pests from destroying your garden.
  4. Plantskydd – an odor-based repellent that deters deer and other pests before they taste the plant.
  5. Put up a fence – this may be the most effective way to keep deer away from your hostas, but it is also the most expensive method. The fence should be 8′ to 10′ high.
  6. Get a dog – having a dog can be an effective way to scare away deer.
  7. Avoid fragrant hostas – deer are attracted to the smell of fragrant hostas. If you have a lot of deer near your home, you might want to avoid planting these in your garden.
  8. Human hair – spread human hair around your garden to keep deer away from your hostas and other plants.
  9. Noise and/or light deterrents – place sensor lights around your garden that will turn on when deer come near your garden. The light will scare them away. You can also try putting radio noise in your garden to scare deer.
  10. Don’t feed the deer – feeding them will just encourage them to keep coming back.

These are just a few tips that can help you keep deer away from hostas and other plants in your garden. There are several deer repellents out there, it’s just a matter of figuring out which method works best for you. We don’t enforce any of the above methods, this is just simply to provide you with information.

Comment below with any other methods that are effective for you!

6 Ways to Keep Rabbits Out of Your Garden

Bkeep rabbits out of your gardenaby bunnies are really cute, there’s no doubt about that! But rabbits can be such an annoyance in your garden! They just go ahead and help themselves to all your plants (hosta gardens and vegetable gardens included)!

The least they could do is ask before helping themselves, but we both know that’s not the case. They usually chew off new shoots of leaves and flowers, leaving your plant nearly leaf-less or flower-less.

For this blog post, I will be focusing on how to keep rabbits out of your garden without harming them in any way.

 

Having a rabbit or two may seem like a minor problem at first, but what you may not realize is that a single rabbit can have 18 off-spring in one year. Suddenly, that minor problem turns into a major problem when a whole family of off-spring producing rabbits settles in next to your garden. Your plants won’t stand a chance!

Below, I have a list of 6 ways to keep rabbits out of your garden that will hopefully be of great help to you. These ways have worked for other people in the past, so it’s just a matter of finding out what works best for you to keep rabbits out of your garden.

6 Ways to Keep Rabbits Out of Your Garden:

1. Put a tall (about two feet high) chicken wire fence around your garden. The rabbits won’t be able to get through the holes of the fence, so this should keep them out. The only downside to this method is that you have the not-so-pretty fence surrounding your beautiful garden.

2. Sprinkle cayenne pepper on the foliage of the plants. Rabbits do not like the taste of cayenne pepper, so they won’t eat the leaves with it sprinkled on them. You will have to remember to reapply the pepper after it rains, though.

3. Sprinkle hair around your plants. This hair can be human, cat, dog, whatever. The rabbits won’t like the hair and will hopefully leave your plants alone.

4. Commercial repellents. Garden stores have a bunch of rabbit repellents you can buy to help keep the rabbits out of your garden. Many of them contain urine and blood from coyotes and foxes. Most are applied using a sprayer.

keep rabbits out of your garden

HostasDirect Owner Tom Carlson’s cat, Simba

5. Used cat litter. Sprinkle some used cat litter around the circumference of your garden. This should help keep rabbits out of your garden because they won’t like the smell of cat urine.

6. Get a cat! The cat will chase those rabbits right of your garden. This is probably one of the best ways to keep rabbits out of your garden.

 

There you have it, 6 ways that will hopefully keep rabbits out of your garden. It may take a combination of several methods to get rid of these pests. It’s kind of trial and error until you find out what works best for you.

Check out our website for more information on garden pests: https://www.hostasdirect.com/learn/hosta-pests/

As always, comment below with any other tips you have to keep rabbits out of your garden that don’t include shooting them!

How to Get Rid of Slugs Eating Hostas

Slugs are a common pest in your hosta garden. Slugs look like snails, but without the shells. They prey on hosta leaves, which means missing foliage and small holes in your hosta’s leaves. They are annoying pests for any hosta enthusiast and can ruin the look of your garden.

How to get rid of slugs eating hostas

This spring, we’ve been noticing a lot of people having slug problems. Slugs prefer lots of moisture. With all the rain we’ve had this year, slugs are everywhere. They prefer cool, dark conditions, so they usually strike at night or when there is cloud cover in temperatures above 50°F. It is important to be proactive with slugs. It is better to start baiting for them early in the spring rather than wait until you notice the first damage on your hostas. Below are a couple tips on how to get rid of slugs eating hostas.

Tips on how to get rid of slugs eating hostas:

  1. Eggshells – crush them up and place them around your hostas. Slugs won’t crawl over eggshells because the sharp edges cut them. Some people save eggshells throughout the winter months in a Ziploc bag. Then, in the spring when they are dried out, they crush them up and place them around their hostas.
  1. Coffee Grounds – just like with the eggshells, lay coffee grounds around your hostas. The caffeine is deadly to the slugs. They will soak up the caffeine through their feet when crawling over the coffee grounds, killing them.
  1. Beer traps – take a small shallow container (cottage cheese container cut down to an inch works great) and bury it to ground level next to your hostas. Then, fill it with beer. Slugs are very attracted to beer and will fall into the trap and drown. You will want to empty and refill the traps each morning (depending, of course, on how many slugs have drowned in the trap).
  1. Epsom salts – place a ring of the salts around your hostas. The slugs won’t go near it!
  1. Put up lots of birdhouses – birds eat slugs, so having lots of birdhouses around your hostas will attract lots of birds to eat the slugs. Problem solved! I’ve also heard of people placing rings of birdseed around their hostas to attract the birds.
  1. Plant slug resistant hostas – Some hostas have thicker leaves that are much harder for slugs to eat. Planting these will reduce the amount of slug damage. Here’s the slug resistant hostas on our website: https://www.hostasdirect.com/buy-hostas?hosta_slug_resistant=502
  1. Slug-killing products from garden store – you can find several slug-killing products at your local garden store such as Sluggo. These have all been effective.

These are tips on how to get rid of slugs eating hostas that have been effective in the past. You will just need to find the method that is most effective for you on how to get rid of slugs eating hostas.

We’d love to hear about any other solutions that have worked for you! Comment below with any tips!

Insect Control – Part One

Lady BugOrganic insect control is one of the easier organic gardening techniques. There are numerous methods and products to rid your garden of insect pests. Encourage your garden’s natural defenses against pests, and let beneficial insects and organisms do the work for you.

Identify Your Pests

You may notice chewed leaves in your garden, but be unable to spot the culprit. It is possible that the larvae or grubs responsible have already left your garden, as it is common for caterpillars and beetle larvae to gorge on plants in the very last few days of that stage of their life cycle. To determine if your pests are already gone, examine the most recent growth on your plants. If that is undamaged, it is likely the pests left before such growth appeared. Another sign that damage is old is that the edges of holes will dry out and turn brown, while fresh holes retain a clean sharply-defined edge.

If you determine that your pests are still present, here are some brief guidelines for matching the pattern of damage to the insect that caused it.

Caterpillars Eating

If you have large, ragged holes in your leaves, they were most likely chewed by beetles or caterpillars. If the holes are tiny, it was done by flea beetles.

If a trail of slime accompanies the ragged holes, the damage was caused by slugs. Leaves that have curled, twisted or appear wilted are the victim of aphids, leafhoppers or thrips that have sucked the moisture from them.

Bug Bite

Leaf weevils chew neat half circles, like little bites, from the edges of leaves. Larvae are usually responsible for damage to roots. A fine web that has curled a leaf in upon itself into an enclosure is evidence of the presence of leafrollers, who feed within the safety of the curled leaf, whereas a web that develops from the underside of leaves is the work of spider mites, often accompanied by white or yellow specks on leaves. Damage to seedlings at the soil surface is caused by cutworms. If leaves have twisted tunnels running through them, it is leafminers that have caused the damage, as they feed on internal leaf tissue.

Once you have narrowed the field of suspects, use a field guide to determine the exact species of pest.

Look for our next post, Organic Insect Control – Part Two, to learn safe, non-toxic methods of controlling insect pests in your garden.