Rest, Renew, Regrow | Hosta Growth Stages After Planting

Author: Peter Kelly, Content Manager

Rest, Renew, Regrow

Those are are three “R”s of horticulture.  They apply to hostas just as they do to any other plant. The three “R”s help us understand the hosta growth stages.  With those words I will answer one of our consumer’s questions: Why are my hostas NOT growing?

Before getting to those three “R”s, the gardener needs to understand that EVERY TIME they move a Hosta it goes into what is known as; “transplant shock”. Then it will go through different hosta growth stages as it adapts to its new surroundings.  

It is a thousand times better to find that right place for the hosta, plant it, and care for it as you wait for it to grow vigorously!

OK, so you have your new hosta or heuchera planted and you’re excited for it to mature; but the plant just sits there.  We assure you that only in film can a plant go ‘sproing’ and suddenly become full sized.   The thing with gardening is that you have to be patient.  How patient?  Rest, Renew, Regrow!

Hosta Growth Stages Using the 3 “R”s

The first stage after you plant something it will … Rest.  Resting means acclimating itself to where it is planted, getting used to the new spot of sun; trying to figure out what nutrients are below it.  If you plant it late in the season it might rest through the second year as well.

The second stage will … Renew.  Renewing means the plant might grow even a little smaller or to the size of what you first planted it.  Fear not brave gardener for the plant is not being lazy on you!  Be it known your plant is growing UNDER the ground and sending out rhizomes and gathering those important nutrients.  Again, depending on the variety, it might carry its renewing into a second year. This is all just part of the hosta growth stages.

We get to the third stage … when the plant Regrows.  This is that hosta growth stage where we may see leaps and bounds of growth.  This is also the time where you might see your first scape and blossom on your plant.  With each year after, the plant will keep moving toward maturity.  Some hostas mature in three (3) years and others take 6 to 8 years primarily due to size and general rate of growth.

Even after that, the plant will continue to look good for years to come if cared for properly.  Over these years, if the gardener is nice they may put in some extra fertilizer to help and encourage the plants to grow.  Remember over-fertilizing can have hazards as well, so fertilize responsibility.

Now lets all take a deep breath and reflectively say, “Rest, Renew, Regrow.”;  and remember to fully exhale.…

10 Ways to Keep Deer Away From Hostas

Deer are a common problem for hosta lovers. One day your garden will be nice and lush, and the next morning you will be left with a bunch of chewed-off stems. This can be very frustrating, so we’ve decided to put together a blog post on ways to keep deer away from hostas to prevent this from happening to you.

keep deer away from hostas

There really is no surefire way to keep deer away from hostas. There are, however, a number of options you can use to help stop them. Several options are listed below.

Tips to Keep Deer Away From Hostas:

  1. Wireless Deer Fence – a sweet smelling deer training device that will train the deer through negative reinforcement. Effective method proven to keep deer away from hostas.
  2. Deer Scram – all natural granular repellent to keep deer away from hostas and other plants including shrubs and trees.
  3. Liquid Fence – a liquid repellent that you spray directly on your plants (be careful not to apply in direct sunlight as this could burn the plant). The scent of the spray will deter deer and other garden pests from destroying your garden.
  4. Plantskydd – an odor-based repellent that deters deer and other pests before they taste the plant.
  5. Put up a fence – this may be the most effective way to keep deer away from your hostas, but it is also the most expensive method. The fence should be 8′ to 10′ high.
  6. Get a dog – having a dog can be an effective way to scare away deer.
  7. Avoid fragrant hostas – deer are attracted to the smell of fragrant hostas. If you have a lot of deer near your home, you might want to avoid planting these in your garden.
  8. Human hair – spread human hair around your garden to keep deer away from your hostas and other plants.
  9. Noise and/or light deterrents – place sensor lights around your garden that will turn on when deer come near your garden. The light will scare them away. You can also try putting radio noise in your garden to scare deer.
  10. Don’t feed the deer – feeding them will just encourage them to keep coming back.

These are just a few tips that can help you keep deer away from hostas and other plants in your garden. There are several deer repellents out there, it’s just a matter of figuring out which method works best for you. We don’t enforce any of the above methods, this is just simply to provide you with information.

Comment below with any other methods that are effective for you!

6 Ways to Keep Rabbits Out of Your Garden

Bkeep rabbits out of your gardenaby bunnies are really cute, there’s no doubt about that! But rabbits can be such an annoyance in your garden! They just go ahead and help themselves to all your plants (hosta gardens and vegetable gardens included)!

The least they could do is ask before helping themselves, but we both know that’s not the case. They usually chew off new shoots of leaves and flowers, leaving your plant nearly leaf-less or flower-less.

For this blog post, I will be focusing on how to keep rabbits out of your garden without harming them in any way.

 

Having a rabbit or two may seem like a minor problem at first, but what you may not realize is that a single rabbit can have 18 off-spring in one year. Suddenly, that minor problem turns into a major problem when a whole family of off-spring producing rabbits settles in next to your garden. Your plants won’t stand a chance!

Below, I have a list of 6 ways to keep rabbits out of your garden that will hopefully be of great help to you. These ways have worked for other people in the past, so it’s just a matter of finding out what works best for you to keep rabbits out of your garden.

6 Ways to Keep Rabbits Out of Your Garden:

1. Put a tall (about two feet high) chicken wire fence around your garden. The rabbits won’t be able to get through the holes of the fence, so this should keep them out. The only downside to this method is that you have the not-so-pretty fence surrounding your beautiful garden.

2. Sprinkle cayenne pepper on the foliage of the plants. Rabbits do not like the taste of cayenne pepper, so they won’t eat the leaves with it sprinkled on them. You will have to remember to reapply the pepper after it rains, though.

3. Sprinkle hair around your plants. This hair can be human, cat, dog, whatever. The rabbits won’t like the hair and will hopefully leave your plants alone.

4. Commercial repellents. Garden stores have a bunch of rabbit repellents you can buy to help keep the rabbits out of your garden. Many of them contain urine and blood from coyotes and foxes. Most are applied using a sprayer.

keep rabbits out of your garden

HostasDirect Owner Tom Carlson’s cat, Simba

5. Used cat litter. Sprinkle some used cat litter around the circumference of your garden. This should help keep rabbits out of your garden because they won’t like the smell of cat urine.

6. Get a cat! The cat will chase those rabbits right of your garden. This is probably one of the best ways to keep rabbits out of your garden.

 

There you have it, 6 ways that will hopefully keep rabbits out of your garden. It may take a combination of several methods to get rid of these pests. It’s kind of trial and error until you find out what works best for you.

Check out our website for more information on garden pests: https://www.hostasdirect.com/learn/hosta-pests/

As always, comment below with any other tips you have to keep rabbits out of your garden that don’t include shooting them!

Gardening Tasks for July

July is a great time to get out and enjoy your garden. By July most of the hard work of spring is completed and this leaves you with plenty of time to sit back and enjoy all your hard work.

We’ve put together a list of six gardening tasks for July to keep up with as your garden progresses through the growing season:

1.     Keep up with deadheading flowers. This not only makes your garden look nice, but also encourages some plants to continue blooming. Who wouldn’t want more flowers?water plants-gardening tasks for july

2.     Make sure your garden has plenty of moisture. The hot summer days can sometimes be quite daunting on plants and they may need more water on hot days. It is recommended that one inch of water per week should be good for hostas. Spread this out over two or three days of watering throughout the week for best results. You don’t want to drown your hostas with too much water at one time. Plants in containers will need to be watered more regularly than ones in the ground. Hanging baskets, especially, dry out quicker and will likely need to be watered daily. If possible, collect rainwater to water your plants.

3.     Keep up on the weeding in your garden. A little time now could save you a lot of time down the road. I’m sure we can all agree that weeding is not the most fun task out there, but it is important. Not only does it help with the appearance of your garden, it can also help prevent slugs and other pests. A clean garden is less likely to have a pest problem than one covered in weeds. Spending ten minutes weeding your garden once per week is better than spending an hour doing it once per month. Do not let the weeds go to seed!

4.     If you haven’t done so already replace/place mulch in your garden. This is one of the important gardening tasks for July because the mulch will help keep moisture in the soil around so they don’t get as dried out, especially on the hot days. Mulch can also help keep slugs away from your hostas.

5.     You can continue fertilizing your hostas throughout the month of July, but we recommend not doing it any later than July 31st.

6.     Bring a lawn chair out to your garden. Sit back and enjoy your hard work.

That concludes our list of gardening tasks for July. It really isn’t too bad, is it?!

Keeping up with these six gardening tasks for July will keep your garden in tip-top shape throughout the summer. It really is a great month to enjoy your garden when most plants will be in bloom and most of the hard spring work is over.

Enjoy!

Comment below on how your garden is doing this year so far. We’d love to see pictures!

8 Steps for Growing Hostas in Containers

Planting hostas in containers is a growing trend. Not only do they grow successfully in containers, they look great as well. Container hostas work great for small urban spaces, around a pool, or on a patio/deck in your backyard.

We have put together a list of 8 steps to having beautiful container hostas.

hosta in round container

1.    Select a container for your hosta. Hostas do great in several different container shapes, but make sure to keep the mature size of your hosta in mind when selecting a container size.

This will not only save you time and energy replanting down the road, but it will ensure that your hosta has enough room to grow.

2.    After you select a container, make sure it has drainage holes in the bottom.

If the container doesn’t come with pre-drilled holes, you can always add them using a power drill. It is recommended to have at least one, but two or three are ideal.

3.    Add a layer of rocks at the bottom of the container. This will aid in drainage and prevent soil from falling through the drilled holes.

4.    Fill the container with nutrient rich, easy draining soil.container hosta with ivy

5.    Plant your hosta in the container. Container hostas look great alone or with ivy hanging down the side of the pot. Just make sure that any other plants you add to your hosta container have relatively similar growing conditions.

Hostas prefer to be kept in shade to partial sun, so it wouldn’t be recommended to add a plant that requires full sun.

 

6.    Water your container hosta regularly, especially in times of extreme heat and wind. Hostas like to have moist soil, but they don’t do well with drenched soil (this can cause their roots to rot). Watering once every one or two days should be good.

7.    Fertilize regularly since the nutrients in the soil will wash away with watering.

8.    Enjoy your beautiful potted hostas for years to come!

potted hosta

*Note: It’s necessary for container hostas to go through a winter dormancy just like those planted in the ground. Don’t leave the containers outside.

Instead, they should be brought into an unheated garage or porch for the winter months. Once the threat of frost is over, your containers can go back outside for the upcoming season.

Comment below with any questions or experience you’ve had growing hostas in containers!